...a regular feature of Clarendon's Gazette newsletter - stories about Hillside and the people buried there

Phoebe Sprague, MD (1846-1904) was born in Holley on December 11, 1846.  Her parents were Danly and Eunice Sprague.  Their home site on Geddes Street has been designated with an historical plaque.  The last owner of her home was Edna McCrillis Weed.  It was dismantled to make room for Merrill’s parking lot. Miss Sprague attended the Holley Academy and the Brockport Collegiate Institute. Her medical training took her to Chicago’s Women’s Medical College.     After moving to Springfield Mass., Dr. Sprague was recognized for her skill and dedication.  While there, she devoted her time and talent as an obstetrician at the Home for Friendless Women.    Due to poor health, she returned to her home in Holley.  She continued to serve as a board member for the House of Refuge for Women of New York State in Albion, and remained active in her various medical societies and the Rebekah Lodge.  She founded the Holley Chapter and served as Worthy Matron.  The local chapter was named in her honor.  After attending the Holley Academy’s first reunion in June 1904, Dr. Sprague died on November 28, 1904 at the age of fifty-seven, two weeks before her fifty-eighth birthday. The stones in the Danly Sprague family’s Hillside plot indicate some who are buried there, but didn’t indicate Dr. Phoebe Sprague.  In 2015, a member of the Clarendon Historical Society had a memorial placed there to honor this outstanding female physician, a native of Holley.

frisbie-obeliskHiram Frisbie (1791-1874) was born in Grandville, NY on August 6, 1791.  In the War of 1812 he joined the cavalry and was assigned to carry dispatches between Sackett’s Harbor and Buffalo.  After the war he settled at Farwell’s Mills (now Clarendon), opening a store and hotel with his partner, William Pierpont.  By 1828, he moved to Holley.  He bought the unsold land at public auction from an original 100 acres tract. He continued to develop lots which created the Village of Holley.

His many business ventures included warehouses on the canal, brick store blocks on the Public Square, a mercantile store, a firm handling local produce and operating a gristmill.

Being civic-minded, he was Supervisor of the town in 1829, and postmaster for many years.  He was also active in the educational development of the village.

Even in later years, Frisbie was still buying property in the area.  His colonial mansion on the banks of the canal was much admired by the locals.  For years, until the bank block was torn down, the Frisbie-Sawyer Opera House was located upstairs.  Around the corner, we still have a street named after the family – Frisbie Terrace.

On August 11, 1874, Mr. Frisbie died.  His wife Juliette A. Butler (1800-1878) died.  Charles Frisbie (1847-1928), their son, continued in the various businesses begun by his father.  His daughters inherited some of their father’s properties around the Square.

The handsome monument which graces the family plot is testimony to the gentleman who was responsible for much of the development of the village.  His wealth, when he died reflected his achievements.  Many of his children are also buried in the family plot.

Recently Dr. Henry Bliss was featured in Hillside Sketches, but one doesn’t have to look too far to realize his father, Edwin Bliss (1819-1901), is worthy of a similar recognition.

Edwin Bliss was born on July 13, 1819 in Kendall, NY.  At first a farmer, he later became a well-recognized carpenter.  Upon moving to Holley in 1867, Bliss became associated with Luther Gordon who had a successful lumber and building business.

Edwin Bliss stoneFor many years he was the principal builder in the village.  In 1879 he built the brick business block on Thomas Street across from the Downs Hotel.  In 1890, he was hired to do the carpentry work on the new Baptist Church on Geddes Street.  The cost of his work, when reported by the Baptist Church at its dedication, was $4,660.67.

He served as trustee of the village and was elected Supervisor of the Town of Murray.  Bliss was one of the organizers of the Holley Electric Light Co., and served as its president in 1894.

The village lost two worthy gentlemen in the year 1901; Edwin Bliss and John Downs.

akeley frontCarl Ethan Akeley was born on Hinds Road in Clarendon on May 19, 1864 to Daniel Webster and Julia Glidden Akeley. He died on a trip to Africa on November 17, 1926. He was buried on the slopes of Mount Mikeno, in the place that he loved.

Akeley is best known as an accomplished taxidermist, sculptor and inventor. He pioneered many new methods of taxidermy and museum dioramas still in use today. For Akeley, taxidermy was a tool for conservation. This meant dangerous expeditions into the African wild to study the species, document their habitats, and bring down most majestic specimens he could find for display in museum dioramas. His work for the American Museum of Natural History lead to the creation of his masterpiece, the Akeley Hall of African Mammals.

Among his contributions to the taxidermy world are the use of lightweight mannequins rather than sawdust to mount the skins, and the study of anatomy to achieve more life-like work. Akeley was obsessive about his methods and would not rest until the desired effect was achieved.

The year of the 150th anniversary of Carl Akeley’s birth, an important connection was made. That connection was between the Clarendon Historical Society and Mr. John Janelli of New Jersey. An idea turned into a project with a goal. That goal was to pay tribute to Carl Akeley in the town where he was born. The town that still recognizes his name and his work.

Fast forward to May 19, 2016 and a grand unveiling of a fitting monument to honor the life and legacy of this brilliant man. With a total cost of more than $12,000 and countless hours of fundraising, planning and a bit of good luck this monument stands as a testament to the life and impact of one man on the world.

The collage on the back of the stone depicts scenes from Akeley’s life. Akeley sculpting his tribute to Teddy Roosevelt, mountain gorilla, the leopard he killed with his bare hands, African Hall, Akeley “pancake” camera, recovering from being mauled by an elephant and holding a gorilla “death mask”.akeley back

Bliss plotDr. Henry Dwight Bliss (1854-1900) and several members of his family are buried in Hillside on a terrace near the back of the east side.  Dr. Bliss was born in Kendall but moved to Holley as a child when his father took on the position of Manager at Luther Gordon’s lumber and coal yard.   As Dwight grew, he helped his father with the accounting part of the business.  This experience is probably what led him to attend the Rochester Business School.  However, it didn’t take long for him to decide the business world wasn’t for him.  He transferred to Cornell University and then to the University of Rochester, from which he graduated in 1880.  By 1883 he had earned his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania’s Medical Department.

He moved to Brooklyn and did his residency at St. John’s Hospital and then opened a private practice in the city.  By 1891, his health was so poor that he took a leave of absence.  It is believed he had contracted tuberculosis from a patient.   Unfortunately, as he was travelling to Europe for rest and recuperation, stormy seas forced the ship to dock at Plymouth.  Overcome with seasickness, Dr. Bliss was hospitalized and unable to make the trip.  He never again was completely well.  By 1898, he had to sell his practice and return to his parents’ Holley home.  He passed away on April 12, 1900.

Also buried in the lot are his wife, Jennie “Jane” Hess (1857-1926) and two infants.  These are son, Edwin Hess Bliss (1888-1889), and daughter, Frances K. Bliss (1893) each of whom lived less than five months.  Another son, Henry Dwight Bliss II (1889-1980), his wife, Ruth, and Dr. Bliss’s parents, Edwin and Mary Bliss are also there.

kennedy_monument

I recently had the pleasure of sitting with Clarendon residents John Kemp and Betty Kennedy-Kemp at their home to learn about Michael Kennedy who served in the 105th and 94th New York Infantry regiments during the Civil War.  This man just happens to be buried in Hillside Cemetery. 

His family monument is substantial and is hard to miss.  Atop a tall base with raised panels stands an Angel who is looking to the heavens and pointing her raised right hand.  In her left hand she holds a chain attached to an anchor which rests alongside her.  The Angels found in the cemetery are a symbol of spirituality. They guard the tomb and are thought to be messengers between God and man. The anchor was regarded in ancient times as a symbol of safety and was adopted by Christians as a symbol of hope and steadfastness. 

Kennedy had a long life, 1842-1934 he experienced things most of us cannot imagine.  Standing only 5 ft. 5 inches tall he enlisted at age 18 and took part in some of the heaviest fighting of the war.  He was shot in the leg and captured.  He spent time in prison after his capture, he escaped and was recaptured. 

After the war he led a successful life buying and selling cattle in Clarendon and eventually becoming the president of the State Exchange Bank in Holley and served for 33 years.

After learning about this man I think that this large monument is quite fitting for a man who was small in stature but brave of heart and stood tall amongst his peers as a leader.

--Melissa Ierlan

IMG_2002The many beautiful monuments in Hillside are eye catching. It makes you wonder who was responsible for their existence. While researching various individuals memorialized by these works of art in stone, I kept running across the name of George Savage. Savage was a monument dealer who opened a marble and granite business in 1882 on Mechanic Street in Holley in a rented building. In 1884 he established his Steam Monumental Works on White Street and the Public Square.   It was the only steam plant of its kind in the area.   He handled all kinds of New England granite and marble for the manufacture of monumental work. He employed 4-5 men year round. In 1891 he advertised he had discovered an entirely new method for finishing marble, done completely by steam, that gave a fine glossy surface more impervious to wear and dirt. Some of the finest monuments in Hillside are attributed to him. These include the ones for Ogden Miller, Edwin Bliss, Harley Hood, Abraham Salisbury, Horace Keys, Orange Eddy, John Berry and others.

George Savage (1859-1944) experienced much loss in his personal life. His first wife, Jessie F. Sears (1862-1886) died less than 3 years after their marriage and a couple weeks after the birth of their first child, Walter, who survived only a couple weeks longer. He married Emma B. Blanchard (1859-1924) in 1887.   While married to Emma, they lost three young children. Their first son, James (1889), lived only one day.   Their daughter, Lucia (1892-1902), died of heart failure accompanied by scarlet fever. Myra (1890-1905) was lost to appendicitis.   After Emma’s death, he married a third time with Amy Barber (1866-1948.) The family is all buried with him in Hillside.

You might expect a grand monument to mark his family’s plot. But, simple rectangular markers, set close to the ground , mark the graves and are nearly obscured by lichen. Another bears the family name and two small Maltese crosses. The eight flared points of the Maltese cross represent the Beatitudes, the declarations of blessedness spoken by Jesus at the beginning of the Sermon on the Mount . Perhaps, George was tired of the grandness of some of his creations, or maybe he had a profound sense of modesty. However, without his artistry and skill, Hillside would be a much less beautiful place.

lamb 2

There is little sadder than the death of a child.  And when the child is very young, it is sadder still.  Hillside is the final resting place of many children.  Two graves that always catch my attention are on the west side of South Holley Road, just north of the storage building.  Within several feet of each other, the marble grave markers are topped by three-dimensional lambs.  This is the most common animal symbol found on a child's grave.  The lamb appears throughout the ages with great regularity in Christian art and because it is a symbol of Christ: "Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world!" (Bible, John 1:29). But, the use of the lamb in religious art even pre-dates Christianity and appears to have been used first by the Egyptians.  It signifies purity and innocence, Christ in his sacrificial role and personifies: innocence, meekness, gentleness and humility.

lamb 1One of these stones is for “Our Darling” Kathy Lee Kimball, daughter of Harry M. and Carrie Kimball.  Kathy lived only a few short months.  The other lamb is for Mable Grace Lusk, daughter of John L. and Velma Warn Lusk.  Mable died before her third birthday.  I find it particularly poignant that flowers are often placed on Mable’s grave, 90 years after her death.  Someone still remembers and misses her.  These small girls have now been reunited with their parents in Hillside Cemetery.

joseph pratt

The Pratt family chose a burial lot on the hPratt stonesighest ground of Hillside for their final resting place. To further distinguish the site there are granite corner markers which support an iron railing. A tall columnar marker carries the family name. Joseph Pratt (1802-1881) purchased the monument before his death for more than $1000, a hefty sum in the late 1800’s. He was born in Massachusetts, moved to Jefferson County, NY when a child and then to the Town of Sweden. Joseph purchased his land on what is now called Bennetts Corners Road in 1829. In time, he built two houses as well as some barns on his land. He had learned the trade of surveying while in Sweden and continued that profession as well as being a farmer. He also was an assessor and served as justice of the peace from 1847-1856. His first wife was Alinda Howard but she died in 1849. In 1851 he married a widow, Chloe Walker Hill, whose husband, Horace B. Hill, had recently died. Chloe was one of the step daughters of Chauncey Robinson, one of Clarendon’s most prominent citizens. Chloe outlived Joseph, passing away in 1900. When Chloe died, newspapers called her one of Clarendon’s oldest and most highly respected women. It was also reported that she was one of the wealthiest women in the county. There are grave stones for both the previous spouses, Alinda and Horace, even though their deaths predate Hillside Cemetery. It is likely their bodies were moved from other places. Also on the lot is Joseph C. Walker, Chloe’s brother, who died in 1898.

Near the back of one of the terraces in Hillside is a handsome stone memorializing the Eddy family. It reminds me of a Greek temple with Corinthian columns supporting an entablature. On small gables on the front and back of the stone are lovely relief carvings of an oak branch and acorns. The oak tree and leaves have been used to symbolize strength, endurance, eternity, honor, hospitality, faith and virtue.Orange Eddy headstone
The head of the family was Orange A. Eddy (1832-1884). He was a lawyer who bought an interest in the Holley Exchange Bank in 1882. He served on the Village of Holley Board and was the chairman in 1867. He was a member of the Holley Lodge # 100 A.O.U.W. (Ancient Order of United Workman, which evolved into Pioneer Mutual Life Insurance Company) and the Holley I.O.O.F. (Independent Order of Odd Fellows) and served as Justice of the Peace for several years, being elected in 1865. Significant to Hillside, he was Secretary of the Holley Cemetery Association when it created our cemetery. He was described in his time as “a gentleman of the strictest integrity, a good lawyer, and he has the entire confidence of the community where he resides, and is entitled to the confidence of all.”
Also listed on the stone is his wife, Harriet M. Hendrick (1834-1903) whom he married September 13, 1866. Two daughters are also included. Their daughter, Grace Augusta Eddy, died in 1875 at just four years old. Their daughter, Mary Eddy Cady, who had married dentist Frank W. Cady, survived into her forties and died in 1913.

frisbie-obeliskHiram Frisbie (1791-1874) was born in Grandville, NY on August 6, 1791.  In the War of 1812 he joined the cavalry and was assigned to carry dispatches between Sackett’s Harbor and Buffalo.  After the war he settled at Farwell’s Mills (now Clarendon), opening a store and hotel with his partner, William Pierpont.  By 1828, he moved to Holley.  He bought the unsold land at public auction from an original 100 acres tract. He continued to develop lots which created the Village of Holley.

His many business ventures included warehouses on the canal, brick store blocks on the Public Square, a mercantile store, a firm handling local produce and operating a gristmill.

Being civic-minded, he was Supervisor of the town in 1829, and postmaster for many years.  He was also active in the educational development of the village.

Even in later years, Frisbie was still buying property in the area.  His colonial mansion on the banks of the canal was much admired by the locals.  For years, until the bank block was torn down, the Frisbie-Sawyer Opera House was located upstairs.  Around the corner, we still have a street named after the family – Frisbie Terrace.

On August 11, 1874, Mr. Frisbie died.  His wife Juliette A. Butler (1800-1878) died.  Charles Frisbie (1847-1928), their son, continued in the various businesses begun by his father.  His daughters inherited some of their father’s properties around the Square.

The handsome monument which graces the family plot is testimony to the gentleman who was responsible for much of the development of the village.  His wealth, when he died reflected his achievements.  Many of his children are also buried in the family plot.

Recently Dr. Henry Bliss was featured in Hillside Sketches, but one doesn’t have to look too far to realize his father, Edwin Bliss (1819-1901), is worthy of a similar recognition.

Edwin Bliss was born on July 13, 1819 in Kendall, NY.  At first a farmer, he later became a well-recognized carpenter.  Upon moving to Holley in 1867, Bliss became associated with Luther Gordon who had a successful lumber and building business.

Edwin Bliss stoneFor many years he was the principal builder in the village.  In 1879 he built the brick business block on Thomas Street across from the Downs Hotel.  In 1890, he was hired to do the carpentry work on the new Baptist Church on Geddes Street.  The cost of his work, when reported by the Baptist Church at its dedication, was $4,660.67.

He served as trustee of the village and was elected Supervisor of the Town of Murray.  Bliss was one of the organizers of the Holley Electric Light Co., and served as its president in 1894.

The village lost two worthy gentlemen in the year 1901; Edwin Bliss and John Downs.

akeley frontCarl Ethan Akeley was born on Hinds Road in Clarendon on May 19, 1864 to Daniel Webster and Julia Glidden Akeley. He died on a trip to Africa on November 17, 1926. He was buried on the slopes of Mount Mikeno, in the place that he loved.

Akeley is best known as an accomplished taxidermist, sculptor and inventor. He pioneered many new methods of taxidermy and museum dioramas still in use today. For Akeley, taxidermy was a tool for conservation. This meant dangerous expeditions into the African wild to study the species, document their habitats, and bring down most majestic specimens he could find for display in museum dioramas. His work for the American Museum of Natural History lead to the creation of his masterpiece, the Akeley Hall of African Mammals.

Among his contributions to the taxidermy world are the use of lightweight mannequins rather than sawdust to mount the skins, and the study of anatomy to achieve more life-like work. Akeley was obsessive about his methods and would not rest until the desired effect was achieved.

The year of the 150th anniversary of Carl Akeley’s birth, an important connection was made. That connection was between the Clarendon Historical Society and Mr. John Janelli of New Jersey. An idea turned into a project with a goal. That goal was to pay tribute to Carl Akeley in the town where he was born. The town that still recognizes his name and his work.

Fast forward to May 19, 2016 and a grand unveiling of a fitting monument to honor the life and legacy of this brilliant man. With a total cost of more than $12,000 and countless hours of fundraising, planning and a bit of good luck this monument stands as a testament to the life and impact of one man on the world.

The collage on the back of the stone depicts scenes from Akeley’s life. Akeley sculpting his tribute to Teddy Roosevelt, mountain gorilla, the leopard he killed with his bare hands, African Hall, Akeley “pancake” camera, recovering from being mauled by an elephant and holding a gorilla “death mask”.akeley back

Bliss plotDr. Henry Dwight Bliss (1854-1900) and several members of his family are buried in Hillside on a terrace near the back of the east side.  Dr. Bliss was born in Kendall but moved to Holley as a child when his father took on the position of Manager at Luther Gordon’s lumber and coal yard.   As Dwight grew, he helped his father with the accounting part of the business.  This experience is probably what led him to attend the Rochester Business School.  However, it didn’t take long for him to decide the business world wasn’t for him.  He transferred to Cornell University and then to the University of Rochester, from which he graduated in 1880.  By 1883 he had earned his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania’s Medical Department.

He moved to Brooklyn and did his residency at St. John’s Hospital and then opened a private practice in the city.  By 1891, his health was so poor that he took a leave of absence.  It is believed he had contracted tuberculosis from a patient.   Unfortunately, as he was travelling to Europe for rest and recuperation, stormy seas forced the ship to dock at Plymouth.  Overcome with seasickness, Dr. Bliss was hospitalized and unable to make the trip.  He never again was completely well.  By 1898, he had to sell his practice and return to his parents’ Holley home.  He passed away on April 12, 1900.

Also buried in the lot are his wife, Jennie “Jane” Hess (1857-1926) and two infants.  These are son, Edwin Hess Bliss (1888-1889), and daughter, Frances K. Bliss (1893) each of whom lived less than five months.  Another son, Henry Dwight Bliss II (1889-1980), his wife, Ruth, and Dr. Bliss’s parents, Edwin and Mary Bliss are also there.

kennedy_monument

I recently had the pleasure of sitting with Clarendon residents John Kemp and Betty Kennedy-Kemp at their home to learn about Michael Kennedy who served in the 105th and 94th New York Infantry regiments during the Civil War.  This man just happens to be buried in Hillside Cemetery. 

His family monument is substantial and is hard to miss.  Atop a tall base with raised panels stands an Angel who is looking to the heavens and pointing her raised right hand.  In her left hand she holds a chain attached to an anchor which rests alongside her.  The Angels found in the cemetery are a symbol of spirituality. They guard the tomb and are thought to be messengers between God and man. The anchor was regarded in ancient times as a symbol of safety and was adopted by Christians as a symbol of hope and steadfastness. 

Kennedy had a long life, 1842-1934 he experienced things most of us cannot imagine.  Standing only 5 ft. 5 inches tall he enlisted at age 18 and took part in some of the heaviest fighting of the war.  He was shot in the leg and captured.  He spent time in prison after his capture, he escaped and was recaptured. 

After the war he led a successful life buying and selling cattle in Clarendon and eventually becoming the president of the State Exchange Bank in Holley and served for 33 years.

After learning about this man I think that this large monument is quite fitting for a man who was small in stature but brave of heart and stood tall amongst his peers as a leader.

--Melissa Ierlan

IMG_2002The many beautiful monuments in Hillside are eye catching. It makes you wonder who was responsible for their existence. While researching various individuals memorialized by these works of art in stone, I kept running across the name of George Savage. Savage was a monument dealer who opened a marble and granite business in 1882 on Mechanic Street in Holley in a rented building. In 1884 he established his Steam Monumental Works on White Street and the Public Square.   It was the only steam plant of its kind in the area.   He handled all kinds of New England granite and marble for the manufacture of monumental work. He employed 4-5 men year round. In 1891 he advertised he had discovered an entirely new method for finishing marble, done completely by steam, that gave a fine glossy surface more impervious to wear and dirt. Some of the finest monuments in Hillside are attributed to him. These include the ones for Ogden Miller, Edwin Bliss, Harley Hood, Abraham Salisbury, Horace Keys, Orange Eddy, John Berry and others.

George Savage (1859-1944) experienced much loss in his personal life. His first wife, Jessie F. Sears (1862-1886) died less than 3 years after their marriage and a couple weeks after the birth of their first child, Walter, who survived only a couple weeks longer. He married Emma B. Blanchard (1859-1924) in 1887.   While married to Emma, they lost three young children. Their first son, James (1889), lived only one day.   Their daughter, Lucia (1892-1902), died of heart failure accompanied by scarlet fever. Myra (1890-1905) was lost to appendicitis.   After Emma’s death, he married a third time with Amy Barber (1866-1948.) The family is all buried with him in Hillside.

You might expect a grand monument to mark his family’s plot. But, simple rectangular markers, set close to the ground , mark the graves and are nearly obscured by lichen. Another bears the family name and two small Maltese crosses. The eight flared points of the Maltese cross represent the Beatitudes, the declarations of blessedness spoken by Jesus at the beginning of the Sermon on the Mount . Perhaps, George was tired of the grandness of some of his creations, or maybe he had a profound sense of modesty. However, without his artistry and skill, Hillside would be a much less beautiful place.

lamb 2

There is little sadder than the death of a child.  And when the child is very young, it is sadder still.  Hillside is the final resting place of many children.  Two graves that always catch my attention are on the west side of South Holley Road, just north of the storage building.  Within several feet of each other, the marble grave markers are topped by three-dimensional lambs.  This is the most common animal symbol found on a child's grave.  The lamb appears throughout the ages with great regularity in Christian art and because it is a symbol of Christ: "Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world!" (Bible, John 1:29). But, the use of the lamb in religious art even pre-dates Christianity and appears to have been used first by the Egyptians.  It signifies purity and innocence, Christ in his sacrificial role and personifies: innocence, meekness, gentleness and humility.

lamb 1One of these stones is for “Our Darling” Kathy Lee Kimball, daughter of Harry M. and Carrie Kimball.  Kathy lived only a few short months.  The other lamb is for Mable Grace Lusk, daughter of John L. and Velma Warn Lusk.  Mable died before her third birthday.  I find it particularly poignant that flowers are often placed on Mable’s grave, 90 years after her death.  Someone still remembers and misses her.  These small girls have now been reunited with their parents in Hillside Cemetery.

joseph pratt

The Pratt family chose a burial lot on the hPratt stonesighest ground of Hillside for their final resting place. To further distinguish the site there are granite corner markers which support an iron railing. A tall columnar marker carries the family name. Joseph Pratt (1802-1881) purchased the monument before his death for more than $1000, a hefty sum in the late 1800’s. He was born in Massachusetts, moved to Jefferson County, NY when a child and then to the Town of Sweden. Joseph purchased his land on what is now called Bennetts Corners Road in 1829. In time, he built two houses as well as some barns on his land. He had learned the trade of surveying while in Sweden and continued that profession as well as being a farmer. He also was an assessor and served as justice of the peace from 1847-1856. His first wife was Alinda Howard but she died in 1849. In 1851 he married a widow, Chloe Walker Hill, whose husband, Horace B. Hill, had recently died. Chloe was one of the step daughters of Chauncey Robinson, one of Clarendon’s most prominent citizens. Chloe outlived Joseph, passing away in 1900. When Chloe died, newspapers called her one of Clarendon’s oldest and most highly respected women. It was also reported that she was one of the wealthiest women in the county. There are grave stones for both the previous spouses, Alinda and Horace, even though their deaths predate Hillside Cemetery. It is likely their bodies were moved from other places. Also on the lot is Joseph C. Walker, Chloe’s brother, who died in 1898.

Near the back of one of the terraces in Hillside is a handsome stone memorializing the Eddy family. It reminds me of a Greek temple with Corinthian columns supporting an entablature. On small gables on the front and back of the stone are lovely relief carvings of an oak branch and acorns. The oak tree and leaves have been used to symbolize strength, endurance, eternity, honor, hospitality, faith and virtue.Orange Eddy headstone
The head of the family was Orange A. Eddy (1832-1884). He was a lawyer who bought an interest in the Holley Exchange Bank in 1882. He served on the Village of Holley Board and was the chairman in 1867. He was a member of the Holley Lodge # 100 A.O.U.W. (Ancient Order of United Workman, which evolved into Pioneer Mutual Life Insurance Company) and the Holley I.O.O.F. (Independent Order of Odd Fellows) and served as Justice of the Peace for several years, being elected in 1865. Significant to Hillside, he was Secretary of the Holley Cemetery Association when it created our cemetery. He was described in his time as “a gentleman of the strictest integrity, a good lawyer, and he has the entire confidence of the community where he resides, and is entitled to the confidence of all.”
Also listed on the stone is his wife, Harriet M. Hendrick (1834-1903) whom he married September 13, 1866. Two daughters are also included. Their daughter, Grace Augusta Eddy, died in 1875 at just four years old. Their daughter, Mary Eddy Cady, who had married dentist Frank W. Cady, survived into her forties and died in 1913.

On a back terrace in Hillside Cemetery you will find a tall monument for the Taylor family. This monument must have been quite attractive when new. Sadly, vandals removed its cap stone and threw it down the terrace. It has been retrieved and is waiting to be replaced at the top of the shaft. Lately, one member of that family has garnered some well-deserved and belated attention. His personal grave marker sits just west of the family monument. If you participated in this year’s Ghost Taylor stoneWalk, you had the opportunity to learn about Private Herbert Charles Taylor from his father’s “ghost”, apply portrayed by Derek Maxfield, a professor at Genesee Community College.
Pvt. Taylor was the only soldier from Orleans County who lost his life in that most famous Civil War battle at Gettysburg. As a member of the New York’s 140th Volunteer Infantry, Taylor was present on Little Round Top on July 2nd, 1863. From the top of the hill, the men looked down into the area known as Devil’s Den where Confederates from Texas were prepared to do battle. The 140th made a stunningly brave attack and overcame the Texans, thus making a tremendous contribution towards the Union victory. Orleans County Historian, Matt Ballard, has called the men of the 140th the “unsung heroes of Little Round Top”. Unfortunately, our own Pvt. Taylor was one of the men who lost his life in this confrontation.
The seventh graders in Albion have been studying Civil War soldiers from Orleans County, including Herbert Taylor. They would like to place a historical marker at his gravesite recognizing his sacrifice. This would be a fine addition to Hillside Cemetery and an important reminder of how the Civil War affected our county.

Daisy Bentham gravestoneRecently we celebrated the generous donation by Brigden Memorials of a beautiful gravestone for Lillian Bentham Black, the Titanic survivor buried in Hillside Cemetery. Now let’s turn our attention to another grave near hers. Lillian wanted to be buried in Hillside to be near her dear sister, Daisy Gertrude Bentham. She and Lillian were daughters of Henry Bentham, a stone cutter in the quarries, and Mary Jane Smith Bentham. Daisy was born June 4, 1888 in England and immigrated to America with her family as a small child in 1891. Lillian was born was born the next year.
Daisy was a beloved child who excelled at Spelling in school. She suffered a long illness before her death which she bore “with gentle resignation”. But she died at home in East Holley on March 2, 1904 before reaching the age of 16. Her obituary describes her as an “exceptionally beautiful and charming child.” This must be true, as her sister wished to be buried near her 73 years later. We usually speak of the Victorian symbols on the older gravestones, and indeed, the sides of Daisy’s stone are gracefully edged with ancanthus leaves which represent eternal life. But Daisy’s stone has a more obvious and heart-rending symbol – that of a daisy with a broken stem – symbolizing her beautiful life, cut short, too soon. In death, she is united with her parents, sister and brother in Hillside Cemetery.

Dr. Padelford photo

Dr. Charles E. Padleford (Sept. 21, 1869- Dec. 6, 1943) was a resident of the town of Murray and had a practice in the village of Holley.padelford stone He was one of two doctors in the village at the time, the other was Dr. Ogden. Dr. Padelford was located in the square near the church for many years. His name appears as attending physician in some of the old birth and death records at the Clarendon Town Hall. His headstone is very unique as it is shaped like an urn which symbolizes the soul, other headstones may have a small urn adorning the top of an obelisk but this large urn is the actual marker. A road is named after him in the town of Murray.

DSC01631 Hayford TreeHillside has two grave markers in the form of tree stumps. Nationwide, you can find thousands of such markers in almost as many variations. The tree stump symbolizes a life cut short and was a funerary art contrivance mimicking the natural surroundings of the park like cemeteries. Generally they were most popular from 1885 to 1905. One of Hillside’s is unusual because it comes well after that period. Many such stones are associated with the members of the Woodsmen of the World, a fraternal benefit society based in Omaha Nebraska that operates a large privately held insurance company for its members. Once again, Hillside’s are a bit different , as they do not seem to be connected to WOW.
DSC01631 xIda Hayworth Clark, the wife of Charles Clark, died at the tender age of 24 in 1892. Her grave marker includes a prominent calla lily which represents beauty. A truncated branch is engraved with the words “At Home With Jesus.” Mary P. Lemke Arendt died in 1940. Her marker includes an anchor which symbolizes hope and a cross to represent Christianity.

One of the many interesting grave markers in Hillside is that of the Post family, sitting on one of the back terraces. It was erected for the death of four year old Clinton PostDSC01610 in 1904. Due to its size, it appears it was meant to also memorialize other family members, but there is no mention of them. We don’t know what happened to the rest of Clinton’s family. Perhaps they moved away. What makes it unique is that it is made of sand cast zinc. It has a distinctive blue-gray color and very prominent decorative details.

Markers such as these were manufactured by the Monumental Bronze Company in Bridgeport, CT from 1874 to 1914 under the marketing name of “White Bronze”. They were sold all over the United States and Canada. The metal weathers very well – better than marble and similar to granite. They were about 1/3 less expensive than a comparable carved stone marker. Unfortunately they are brittle and can be easily broken. Typical of the style, the Post monument has bolted-on panels with very ornate symbolic decoration. These could be replaced, as other family members died, with panels customized with their names, birth and death dates etc. Since the Post family never did this, we are able to see and enjoy the original panels. These include a wreath of flowers which includes roses, lilies and other flowers; a shaft of wheat with a sickle; a wooden cross entwined with ivy and an anchor. Each of these had a symbolic meaning. For example, lilies represent purity, a shaft of wheat means a long and fruitful life, a cross is emblematic of a Christian life and an anchor is a symbol of hope. Little Clinton’s actual grave site is marked with a zinc statue of a lamb which symbolizes innocence.

Hillside has a few other zinc markers. Why not take a stroll and locate them?

DSC01602One of the most evocative gravestones in Hillside is near the north end, east of South Holley Road. Look for a broken column (symbolizes loss of head of the family) draped with cloth (symbol of loss and mourning) topped by an urn (symbol of the the body as a temporary vessel for the soul.) The family name is Buddery. Upon reading the stone, you will see that it memorializes John W. Buddery. John was married to Mary Youngs. They lived in Hulberton and he died in 1888. The most striking part of this stone is discovered when you read the other inscriptions. Four of John and Mary’s five children are also included. They all died within weeks of their father. The oldest was 7 years old. A little research will tell you that they died of diphtheria. Only Mary and her infant child survived, although both were struck ill. It was thought that Mary somehow developed a resistance to the disease and passed her immunity onto her nursing child.
Diptheria is an infectious disease caused by bacteria. Starting with flu like symptoms it can lead to respiratory failure or death due to a pseudomembrane formation that blocks the airway. A vaccine was developed in the 1920’s and in countries, such as ours, where vaccination is common, the disease is seldom heard of today. Reflecting on this stone, one can appreciate the difficult challenges that our ancestors faced from disease and be thankful for what modern medicine can do.

DSC02911Jewell Buckman was a young man who loved plants and music. He was also the first local man to die in the First World War, the “War to End All Wars”. He graduated from Holley High School, the only child of Albert and Myra Buckman. He attended the University at Baton Rouge for two years in military training He then studied landscaping, which he hoped to make his career, in Flint, Michigan. He was the organist at the Baptist church for three years. He landscaped his parents’ yard which was known as one of the most beautiful in the village. And, he enlisted in the Marine Corps in August 1917. He was stationed at Parris Island, SC and Quantico, VA before shipping out to France on December 31, 1917. It is known that he served in the front line trenches from at least late April 1918. He died at Chateau-Thierry-Belleau Woods in France on June 6, 1918 in one of the most important and bloodiest battles against the Germans.  In his last letter to his parents, less than two weeks before his death, he discussed several of his further plans for their yard. He said he had seen Laburnum, the golden chain tree, in bloom in France and planned to plant three of them when he returned home. He asked that they have their pictures taken and send them to him. And then they received the telegram telling them he was killed in action. He was 26 years old.

His death rocked the community; the distant war had come home. An impressive memorial service was held at the Presbyterian Church with honor guards, a memorial proclamation from the Village Board and the reading of a telegram from George Barnett, Major General Commandant of the Marine Corps.

Today, the Holley VFW Post is named in his honor and they hold ceremonies at his gravesite every Memorial Day and Veteran’s Day.

DSC02747April 15th marks the 103rd anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. Only 701 people survived the disaster. More than twice that number perished. It is surprising to learn that three people from our community were onboard that dreadful day.
Nineteen year old Lillian Betham nearly lost her life in the tragedy. She was fortunate enough to find a seat on the last life boat, number 12. She would marry John Black and live in Rochester until her death on Dec. 15, 1977 at the age of 85. She is buried in Hillside Cemetery in an unmarked grave on the east side of South Holley Road. (Editors note: click here to learn of marker added in October 2015)
William Douton, age 55, was a stone cutter who had gone back to England for the first time in 25 years to visit family and friends. He had planned to return home on the vessel Olympic. However, he was delayed and instead boarded the “unsinkable” Titanic on its maiden voyage on April 10, 1912. Peter McKain, age 46, was a fellow quarryman. Both were lost at sea.
Our community mourned the loss of Douton and MacKain as they welcomed Bentham back. The St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Holley held a memorial service for them and the other "brave men of the Titanic who stood aside so the women and children could be saved," according to a program from the service. The Independent Order of Odd Fellows erected a monument in Douton's and MacKain's honor in Hillside Cemetery. This monument can be seen near the fence on the east side of South Holley Road roughly across the from Bentham’s grave.